Paragon’s Call and NaNoWriMo

I have been making slow but relatively steady progress on Paragon’s Call, splitting my time with another writing project. I’m at about 53,000 words, which puts me at just over half-way through the overall plot. I estimate Paragon’s Call will be around 100,000 words, maybe a bit more. For perspective, Ohlen’s Arrow and Ohlen’s Bane were each about 64,000 words.

November is NaNoWriMo … National Novel Writing Month. The goal is to write 50,000 words in the month, with the specific goal of writing something every day for 30 days straight. I appreciate the concept and motivation for NaNoWriMo, but use a different approach. Rather than writing every day, I write only on Saturday and Sunday mornings, and crank out anywhere from 5,000 to 10,000 words in a weekend.

Mid-August update

Paragon’s Call has seen some progress, although not as much as I’d hoped. I’ve been working on some unrelated short story projects, and as is often the case during July and August, I’ve been out of town on weekends.

Fortunately, I have reached a turning point in the plot of Paragon’s Call where the action changed — think of it as the beginning of Act II — and it’s the part of the story I’ve been looking forward to writing the most.

Paragon’s Call update, progress

This is just a quick update on where I’m at with Paragon’s Call. I’m about 25,000 words into the story so far and after reading over what’s in ink, I’m very happy with the progress. I think this book will have a higher production value and overall maturity to the writing style and plot … mature, as in professional, not mature as in adult. If that makes sense.

Paragon’s Call has begun

After about a month of planning and research, I have created a Plot Event List and have begun primary composition of the third book in the Taesian Chronicles. At this point, my working title is The Paragon’s Call. Stay tuned on that.

My production rate is currently averaging 3,100 words a day, but unfortunately I’m only writing one day a week. Part of my problem is I rarely have the creative energy to write in the evenings after work. If I could do that, then I’d have my book written in a month.

As has been the case with my first two books, Ohlen’s Arrow and its sequel, Ohlen’s Bane, I’m relying heavily on the brilliance that is called Scrivener, from Literature and Latte. This program is a serious productivity tool for writers.