X-Plane switch from Airfoil Labs to Reality Expansion Pack Cessna 172

X-Plane comes with a Cessna 172 by default. It’s a competent plane and it is what I have flown since I got X-Plane 11 back in May of 2017. I wanted more realism so I purchased the after-market Cessna 172 by Airfoil Labs.

It was buggy and presented several challenges to flying. I had to learn how to land all over again. There were several graphical issues that prevented me from flying the AFL 172 at all. I got fed up and uninstalled it.

After reading posts from other sim pilots on X-Plane.org’s forum, I discovered another approach. Now, I fly the default Cessna 172 with the SimCoders.com Reality Expansion Pack ($19.99) installed on top of it.

The aircraft experience feels more immersive, because I’m not just flying a virtual plane, I’m managing the entire aircraft from when I approach it on the tarmac to take-off to flight to landing and finally when I park it. I even conduct maintenance on it like I would a real airplane.

The REP has been very stable, too. There was one sound error that occurred, but removing the Cessna 172 from the list of possible AI aircraft fixed the problem.

So far, I’m very impressed with this approach.

Crosswind landings in X-Plane

I’ve spent several hours practicing pattern work, but I’ve always done it with clear weather and no wind. Lately, I’ve attempted to add crosswinds to the mix to simulate more real-world conditions. It hasn’t gone well.

I set up a 6 kt 90 degree crosswind at Aurora Muni (KUAO) and took off in the X-Plane default Cessna 172. Take-off and flying the left-hand pattern went relatively well, but when I came in on final and entered the glideslope, things seemed to get wonky.

My approach was made on runway 35 so the wind should have been directly from my left. The windsock showed this to be true. However, my plane seemed to be drifting to the left. I attempted a forward slip with a little right aileron and a small amount of left rudder, and things went wonky even more.

It was crazy trying to get the plane lined up with the runway, yet the wind was only 6 knots, with no gusts configured. I gunned the engine, raised my flaps, and conducted a go-around.

As I was flying the pattern again, I paid close attention to what the wind seemed to be doing to the aircraft. At pattern altitude of 1,000 feet AGL, it seemed to be getting blown to the west. That’s incorrect — the wind was configured to be blowing from the west. I turned onto the base leg and the groundspeed slowed, again indicating I had a headwind from the east. When I turned onto the final leg, once again I had fits getting a line on the runway.

I’ve heard that X-Plane 11 has notoriously inaccurate ground effect winds and handling. This seems to be the case. When I got my wheels on the ground, I turned my ailerons fully to the left, to the west and the direction the windsock indicated the wind was blowing, and got shot far to the right and onto the grass.

I can’t confirm it, but it very much acted like the wind was blowing the exact opposite direction the windsock was indicating (and the weather configuration specified).

UPDATE 01-29-2018: I have confirmed the wind and windsock are behaving correctly in X-Plane. It’s operator error on my part.

Writing at my day job

I’m not just an author, I’m also a project manager and senior web developer. That’s actually how I pay the rent, so to speak, but fortunately for me I get to spend a fair bit of time writing at the office. In addition to being the senior project manager, I’m also the writer and editor of the corporate blog.

eRep, Inc.
Learn about the CVI at www.erep.com

The company I work for is eRep, Inc. When people ask me where I work and what we do there, I say, “We sell happiness.” This always generates a fair bit of intrigue and interest because it’s a vague answer that begs for further explanation.

Erep is entirely focused on the Core Values Index assessment. It is a psychometric assessment that measures and defines a person’s innate unchanging nature. It is your personality’s DNA, as I like to describe it.

The CVI is your personality’s DNA.

The CVI assessment starts with an online test that usually takes 7-10 minutes to complete. When done, you are given a score that represents how much of four separate personalty types you possess. It sounds simplistic when I describe it that way, but the number of combinations of those four types is in the trillions.

Personality Types

The Core Values Index assessment is made up of four core values, based on power, love, wisdom and knowledge. These go by the names of Builder, Merchant, Innovator, and Banker, respectively. When you take the CVI, you are given a score between 0 and 36 in each of these four energies or core values, with a total combined score that always sums to 72.

It is your particular combination of these four values that represent your CVI score. Your core values represent where you are the happiest, whether it be solving problems, building relationships, acquiring knowledge, or taking charge and leading others.

The best way I can explain this is to describe my own CVI score. I am a 27 points Innovator and 17 points Banker. My Builder score is 15 points and my Merchant score is 13 points. In the parlance of the CVI, I am an Innovator/Banker.

This means that I value solving problems more than anything, and value knowledge—both its acquisition and dispensation—secondarily. Innovators are all about being the wisdom in the room. Solving problems is their passion, and they don’t believe there’s a problem they can’t solve with enough time. Bankers value knowledge. This combination of core values lends itself to me being naturally and innately drawn to project management and product development.

Merchants find their happiness in the relationships they form with other people. They like to motivate others with their emotional energy and enthusiasm, and they excel at forming consensus among groups. They tend toward being team leaders or team motivators.

Builders are the power in the room. They take charge and get things done. If Innovators can be described as “get it right” kind of people, Builders are “get it done” kind of folks. They love checking things off of lists and earning that strong sense of accomplishment. They are all about action, sometimes to the point of saying, “Get out of the way, let me do it.”

As you can imagine, Builder/Merchants or Merchant/Builders tend to find themselves in positions of power and influence.

These are highlight explanations and don’t do the core values justice. The best way to learn more about the CVI is to read the blog at eRep.

Or better yet, take the free CVI and get your own score. I highly recommend paying for an upgraded CVI. For $49.95 you get a full 17-page report describing your individual CVI profile in full detail. I’ve yet to meet someone who took the CVI and got their upgraded report and regretted it. In fact, they invariably become strong advocates of the assessment, motivating their friends, coworkers, and family to take the CVI.